FAQ

What power source does the e700 Electronic Transport Ventilator require?


The e700 Electronic Transport Ventilator is a pneumatically powered, electronically controlled Ventilator. It uses advanced micro-pneumatic circuitry to provide a comprehensive range of patient parameters and ventilation features with an amazing 18 to 24 operational time from its Lithium-Ion Battery.




What is the purpose or the visual gas supply indicator?


The gas supply indicator is not only visual but also provides an audible warning as well. When the e700 is attached to an appropriate gas supply, the audible and visual alarm indicator will provide an ongoing status of your cylinder duration.
Low oxygen cylinder contents will cause a yellow flashing symbol to appear with a pulsing audible alarm indicator. As the oxygen cylinder depletes further, the visual indicator will flash red and the audible alarm indicator will increase in pulse frequency.
This serves as a reminder during hectic resuscitation efforts when the last thing on everyone’s mind is the amount of oxygen left in the portable cylinder.




What happens if I run out of oxygen during use?


In accordance with the International Standards for this type of device, the ventilator is equipped with a failsafe Emergency Air Intake circuit which allows the spontaneously breathing patient to draw ambient air through the circuit should the gas supply fail.




What if I don’t want to use 100% oxygen on my patient?


To conserve oxygen during long transports or when a patient’s respiratory condition demands an oxygen concentration of less than 100%, the air mix mode can be selected.
The e700 entrains ambient air through the internal Venturi system for ventilation when the O2 concentration is set at 60%. This provides not only decreased oxygen concentration but also increases the ventilator operating time on an oxygen cylinder.




When using end-tidal CO2 with the eSeries ventilators, some customers use sidestream capnography with a nasal cannula. What is our recommendation for a masked patient?


ETCO2 (End-tidal CO2) is the level of carbon dioxide released at the end of an exhaled breath. Capnography is the way in which ETCO2 is captured and displayed. The two types of capnography are either mainstream (passive) where the sensor is placed in the respiratory circuit or side stream (active) where exhaled air is pumped from the circuit to a device in which the sensor resides.
With a mask or intubated patient on the ventilator, the ETCO2 sensor can be placed between the mask or ET tube and the elbow of the circuit (mainstream). If they use nasal prongs for ETCO2 measurement then a side-stream capnography is required.




What happens if I don’t make a selection of the patient size during the quick start menu?


If no desired patient size is selected within 20 seconds, the e700 will start automatic ventilation at the child setting as its default start-up in A/CV Ventilation mode.




What happens if I don’t want the Child setting as my default mode?


You simply rotate the Control Selection Knob to move the yellow cursor to section 3 of the screen to the ventilation mode setup, or to the parameter to be set up located at section 6 of the screen. The Healthcare Provider must confirm the selection by pressing the Control Selection Knob. Once confirmed, the selected area will be highlighted with a solid contrast background.
Navigate among the available settings by rotating the Control Selection Knob. Press the Control Selection Knob to choose the desired setting. The chosen setting will turn yellow with the flashing confirmation symbol and the Confirmation indicator to guide Healthcare Provider to activate the setup by pressing the Control Selection Knob again.
Press the Control Selection Knob to activate the setup. The Healthcare Provider can press the Cancel button to go back to previous parameters if setting choices need to be changed or were selected incorrectly before activation. Finally, press the Control Selection Knob to activate the multiple setting set-up at once.
If no selection occurs within 10 seconds or the Control Selection Knob is not pressed to confirm the changed parameter setting within 10 seconds, changes will be canceled and the previous parameter values will remain.




How can the e700 be used during CPR?


The e700 Electronic Transport Ventilator is designed to complement and enhance patient care during CPR and Respiratory Arrest. The e700 is designed to provide the correct Breaths per Minute, along with the correct tidal volume for patient sizes ranging from children to large adults while providing visual and audible prompts.
During CPR, the e700 Electronic Transport Ventilator provides concise ventilation volumes and rates allowing the Rescuer to perform accurate timing of the chest compressions between ventilations, which is often difficult with manual ventilation methods such as a Bag-Valve-Mask or Oxygen Powered Manually Triggered Demand Valve Resuscitator, especially during patient loading and transport.

This also frees the Healthcare Provider to perform correct chest compressions, advanced patient management protocols such as Intubation, defibrillation, I.V. therapy, with the confidence that the patient’s ventilation requirements are being met.
In the mask ventilated patient the automatic cycling stops for 20 seconds (Guidelines 2010) to allow for the provision of the 30 chest compressions. However, in the intubated (advanced airway adjunct), the e700 allows for asynchronous chest compressions to ventilations.




Can I use the SIMV mode during CPR?


It is not recommended to use the SIMV mode during the provision of chest compressions as the negative pressure created by the chest recoil may trigger the ventilator into the spontaneous mode and stop the ventilator from cycling. Use either one of the two CPR modes provided or, if using an automated chest compression device, use A/C V with the trigger setting at (-).
In SIMV if the patient takes a breath outside of the trigger window it will be an unsupported breath. However, in the trigger window, they receive a supported breath up to 120 Liters?
The SIMV mode allows for spontaneous breaths to be taken during the spontaneous window of the ventilatory cycle while maintaining a minimum respiratory rate (the set respiratory rate) and minute volume. The spontaneous breaths are unsupported by the ventilator and are drawn from ambient.
If the patient initiates a spontaneous breath within the trigger window and the inspiratory flow exceeds the trigger setting, the ventilator will sense the patient’s inspiratory effort and will deliver one breath of the set tidal volume at the set inspiratory time. Depending on the point of initiation of the spontaneous breath the expiratory time of the respiratory cycle may change however the I time is constant and the respiratory rate remains constant.
At the end of the cycle, the ventilator will commence the next automatic ventilation unless the patient again initiates a subsequent breath during the trigger window. This mode of ventilation ensures a mandatory minute volume with set inspiratory times, tidal volume delivery and flows while allowing additional breaths to be taken during the spontaneous window as well as patient triggering of automatic breaths during the trigger window.




What is the purpose or the visual gas supply indicator?


The gas supply indicator is not only visual but also provides an audible warning as well. When the e700 is attached to an appropriate gas supply, the audible and visual alarm indicator will provide an ongoing status of your cylinder duration.
Low oxygen cylinder contents will cause a yellow flashing symbol to appear with a pulsing audible alarm indicator. As the oxygen cylinder depletes further, the visual indicator will flash red and the audible alarm indicator will increase in pulse frequency.
This serves as a reminder during hectic resuscitation efforts when the last thing on everyone’s mind is the amount of oxygen left in the portable cylinder.




What happens if I run out of oxygen during use?


In accordance with the International Standards for this type of device, the ventilator is equipped with a failsafe Emergency Air Intake circuit which allows the spontaneously breathing patient to draw ambient air through the circuit should the gas supply fail.




What if I don’t want to use 100% oxygen on my patient?


To conserve oxygen during long transports or when a patient’s respiratory condition demands an oxygen concentration of less than 100%, the air mix mode can be selected.
The e700 entrains ambient air through the internal Venturi system for ventilation when the O2 concentration is set at 60%. This provides not only decreased oxygen concentration but also increases the ventilator operating time on an oxygen cylinder.




When using end-tidal CO2 with the eSeries ventilators, some customers use sidestream capnography with a nasal cannula. What is our recommendation for a masked patient?


ETCO2 (End-tidal CO2) is the level of carbon dioxide released at the end of an exhaled breath. Capnography is the way in which ETCO2 is captured and displayed. The two types of capnography are either mainstream (passive) where the sensor is placed in the respiratory circuit or side stream (active) where exhaled air is pumped from the circuit to a device in which the sensor resides.
With a mask or intubated patient on the ventilator, the ETCO2 sensor can be placed between the mask or ET tube and the elbow of the circuit (mainstream). If they use nasal prongs for ETCO2 measurement then a side-stream capnograph is required.




What happens if I don’t make a selection of the patient size during the quick start menu?


If no desired patient size is selected within 20 seconds, the e700 will start automatic ventilation at the child setting as its default start-up in A/CV Ventilation mode.




What happens if I don’t want the Child setting as my default mode?


You simply rotate the Control Selection Knob to move the yellow cursor to section 3 of the screen to the ventilation mode setup, or to the parameter to be set up located at section 6 of the screen. The Healthcare Provider must confirm the selection by pressing the Control Selection Knob. Once confirmed, the selected area will be highlighted with a solid contrast background.
Navigate among the available settings by rotating the Control Selection Knob. Press the Control Selection Knob to choose the desired setting. The chosen setting will turn yellow with the flashing confirmation symbol and the Confirmation indicator to guide Healthcare Provider to activate the setup by pressing the Control Selection Knob again.
Press the Control Selection Knob to activate the setup. The Healthcare Provider can press the Cancel button to go back to previous parameters if setting choices need to be changed or were selected incorrectly before activation. Finally, press the Control Selection Knob to activate the multiple setting set-up at once.
If no selection occurs within 10 seconds or the Control Selection Knob is not pressed to confirm the changed parameter setting within 10 seconds, changes will be canceled and the previous parameter values will remain.




How can the e700 be used during CPR?


The e700 Electronic Transport Ventilator is designed to complement and enhance patient care during CPR and Respiratory Arrest. The e700 is designed to provide the correct Breaths per Minute, along with the correct tidal volume for patient sizes ranging from children to large adults while providing visual and audible prompts.
During CPR, the e700 Electronic Transport Ventilator provides concise ventilation volumes and rates allowing the Rescuer to perform accurate timing of the chest compressions between ventilations, which is often difficult with manual ventilation methods such as a Bag-Valve-Mask or Oxygen Powered Manually Triggered Demand Valve Resuscitator, especially during patient loading and transport.

This also frees the Healthcare Provider to perform correct chest compressions, advanced patient management protocols such as Intubation, defibrillation, I.V. therapy, with the confidence that the patient’s ventilation requirements are being met.
In the mask ventilated patient the automatic cycling stops for 20 seconds (Guidelines 2010) to allow for the provision of the 30 chest compressions. However, in the intubated (advanced airway adjunct), the e700 allows for asynchronous chest compressions to ventilation.




Can I use the SIMV mode during CPR?


It is not recommended to use the SIMV mode during the provision of chest compressions as the negative pressure created by the chest recoil may trigger the ventilator into the spontaneous mode and stop the ventilator from cycling. Use either one of the two CPR modes provided or, if using an automated chest compression device, use A/C V with the trigger setting at (-).
In SIMV if the patient takes a breath outside of the trigger window it will be an unsupported breath. However, in the trigger window, they receive a supported breath up to 120 Liters?
The SIMV mode allows for spontaneous breaths to be taken during the spontaneous window of the ventilatory cycle while maintaining a minimum respiratory rate (the set respiratory rate) and minute volume. The spontaneous breaths are unsupported by the ventilator and are drawn from ambient.
If the patient initiates a spontaneous breath within the trigger window and the inspiratory flow exceeds the trigger setting, the ventilator will sense the patient’s inspiratory effort and will deliver one breath of the set tidal volume at the set inspiratory time. Depending on the point of initiation of the spontaneous breath the expiratory time of the respiratory cycle may change however the I time is constant and the respiratory rate remains constant.
At the end of the cycle, the ventilator will commence the next automatic ventilation unless the patient again initiates a subsequent breath during the trigger window. This mode of ventilation ensures a mandatory minute volume with set inspiratory times, tidal volume delivery and flows while allowing additional breaths to be taken during the spontaneous window as well as patient triggering of automatic breaths during the trigger window.




What happens if I want to provide PEEP or CPAP?


The e700 is equipped with both adjustable PEEP and CPAP control that allows the Health Care Provider to maintain a positive pressure in the patient’s airway during all ventilation phases of the ventilation cycle. This ensures that the lungs remain in a partially expanded state to reduce the risk of lung collapse. The Live Monitoring, as well as setting indicator, will register and show the levels of CPAP or PEEP being delivered to the patient.




It appears that with the e700 in CPAP mode, it seems to only provide airflow during inspiration. Is this the way it is supposed to function? What is providing the PEEP during expiration since there is no airflow? Is there a mechanical PEEP being applied that is not readily apparent?


As stated in the manual, the ventilator provides a continuous flow, meaning that the flow is continuous throughout the respiratory cycle. There is no mechanical PEEP, everything is controlled by the continual fine adjustment of the gas flow, and the control of the expiratory port by that flow, to maintain the constant airway pressure.




Why is there a default pressure trigger at 2cmH2O below CPAP settings?


The default trigger is a monitoring function pertaining to the minimum inspiratory pressure that the ventilator monitors to ensure spontaneous breathing (in combination with the flow monitoring) before switching into apnea mode.




Is there any significant physiological difference between CPAP + PS and BiPAP?


With CPAP + PS you have low pressure, the underlying CPAP and high pressure, the PS which is above the CPAP. With BiPAP, you have low pressure, the EPAP and high pressure, the IPAP.
Both these methods provide the same physiological action because you, in fact, have high pressure and low pressure with both modes.
Usually, Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) is a term used to encompass ventilation without an endotracheal tube (i.e. both CPAP and BiPAP).
The term Pressure Support is really only used with an intubated patient. The term BiPAP is used if it is NIPPV. This is really semantics but there are some minor differences.
CPAP= PEEP for all intents and purposes BiPAP ~ CPAP + PSV (except the way you talk about the numbers)
So a setting of Pressure Support of 10 and CPAP of 5 is equivalent to BiPAP with an IPAP 15 and EPAP 5. If you are transferring a patient who is on BiPAP at 15/5 you would need to set the e700 to CPAP + PSV with a CPAP of 5 and a PSV of 10 (the peak pressure in this mode is additive).
Basically there is no difference between CPAP + PSV and BiPAP in terms of how most ventilators will deliver the PEEP + Pressure support (or in NIPPV, IPAP, and EPAP).
So there is no major physiological difference between CPAP + PS or BiPAP.




Why is it that you sometimes may hear a clicking sound when the eVent is in CPAP mode and the patient is spontaneously breathing or has their mouth open without taking a breath?


When a patient speaks, there will be on and off of their exhaled breath after each word or sentence. This creates a pressure fluctuation in the circuit and the pneumotach picks up this pressure change and tries to overcome it to balance the pressure to the level set by the Healthcare Provider by opening and closing the solenoid valves.
Obstructing the circuit and/or breath-holding will have the same effect as the ventilator tries to maintain consistent pressure. As with speaking, the solenoids open and close trying to maintain the pressure against this fluctuation in the breathing pattern.




What does the “Flow Termination” setting do during PSV?


The flow termination setting is the point in the respiratory cycle where the inspiratory flow drops by a percentage (set by the operator) below the peak flow required to reach the target pressure reducing the resistance to expiration. As a rule of thumb, the higher the percentage selected the quicker the ventilator responds to the change in flow and the easier it is for the patient to expire.
During CPAP + PSV, the patient is receiving inspiratory and expiratory pressure at two levels, effectively creating bi-level, non-invasive, pressure ventilation (BiPAP).




When showing the apnea feature in CPAP, the ventilator would go into ACV as it should. Yet once in ACV, the rate would shoot up around 23 – 24 even though the breath rate setting was at 10. Patient effort icon was also flashing on the screen (but the vents were hooked up to test lung.) I realized there was no elbow on the end of the circuit. With the elbow attached problem went away. Do you have an idea why the vent would respond that way without the elbow?


This is to do with the simplistic nature of our test lung and the gas flow through the pneumotach. Without the elbow there is no turbulence created in the air stream, the gas flows directly through the restrictor in the lung and the sensor “sees” things that are not really there and decides that the patient is triggering breaths so the rate goes up.
With the elbow in place, the turbulence created by the gas having to flow around the corner calms the situation and stops the sensor from being fooled”. In order to prevent this from occurring, the elbows on the circuit are glued to prevent disassembly.




What type of circuit do I require when using the e700 with a Pediatric Patient?


In order to streamline the number of accessories required to operate the e700 and the need for a secondary circuit, the e700 Patient Circuits have been designed for use with all patient ranges. Our “one circuit fits all” concept provides a cost-saving as well as saving space in already overstocked airway management kits. it to carry and stock)




Can I use a Bacterial Filter or HME (Heat Moisture Exchange) with the e700?


If using a Bacterial Filter or HME, you must connect them to the patient connector between the elbow and the endotracheal tube or face mask. This will increase the dead space by the volume of the selected filter or HME and may increase breathing resistances.




What happens if I keep the Manual Button depressed without releasing it?


When the Manual Button is depressed, a mandatory breath will be initiated and either the flow rate or set pressure control parameter will be delivered until the I-time is achieved.
After the set I-time is achieved, the e700 will switch to inspiratory hold function in which the ventilator will cut the flow, but will keep the exhalation port closed in order to block exhaled gas from going to the ambient resulting in the maintenance of lung pressure.

The maximum expiratory hold time is 6 seconds, after which time, the ventilator will switch to the exhalation phase by opening the exhalation port to ambient.




How often should the intake filter be changed?


The e700 entrains ambient air through the internal Venturi system for ventilation when the O2 concentration is set at 60%.
Always keep the ambient air filter housing clear of obstructions. It is recommended that the filter be replaced whenever air mix is used and/or where the ventilator has been used in cross-contamination situations or pollutant environments. The entrainment of pollutants into the ventilator may cause the ventilator to malfunction or cause danger to the patient.




Where can I put the e700 Electronic Transport Ventilator during patient transfer or transport?


An optional eSeries Universal Mounting Bracket allows the lightweight e700 to be attached to ambulance/gurney/hospital bed rail or trolley poles.
In addition, the eSeries Carrying Case. A semi-rigid bag that organizes your automatic transport ventilator, oxygen circuit and hose, power cables and extra batteries. This makes the e700 Electronic Transport Ventilator convenient to use during transport.
It has been designed to easily attach and detach to the rails of a hospital gurney or ambulance cot during patient transport. This also allows the settings controls of the e700 to be accessed at any time. In addition, it has a storage compartment for extra patient circuit and mask.




What is the recommended Preventive Maintenance schedule and intervals for Servicing?


It is recommended that the routine preventive maintenance (PM) should be carried out as per the following table and the ventilator be returned to O-Two Medical Technologies or an Authorized Service Center for inspection and service every 24 months.

Repair and general overhaul of the ventilator must be carried out by trained service personnel. Evaluation of performance against the manufacturer’s specifications should only be performed by an Authorized O-Two Medical Technologies Service Center.
Any malfunction unit should be returned to the manufacturer or an authorized service center since this product is not designed for field disassembly or service.




What is the warranty period for the e700?


O-Two Warrants the e700 ventilator when used in accordance with the instructions contained within the Instruction Manual, for a period of two years from the date of purchase against manufacturing defects.




Can I use the e700 Ventilator in a hyperbaric chamber?


Operation of the e700 below sea level (hyperbaric chamber) or above 4,000 metres (13,000 feet) may result in reduction or failure in the e700’s performance, low pressure alarm or possible loss of automatic cycling. As with most ventilators used during hyperbaric medicine, they are left outside of the physical chamber and ventilation is provided by the circuit which is introduced through special accessory ports of the chamber.




If the patient is on a Lucas device and in AC/V, even though the trigger is off and it won’t deliver a demand breath, will the vent detect an inspiratory effort should the patient obtain ROSC and attempt a breath? Would it still show the green lung icon?


With the Trigger turned to “-” the ventilator does not register any inspiratory effort on the part of the patient. With the trigger turned on the re-coil flow may trigger the ventilator and the trigger symbol will light up which is why we recommend having the trigger off during automated chest compression. Therefore the patient effort symbol cannot be used as a method of establishing ROSC.




Why would the ventilator have an alarm leak and also a patient effort alarm when the patient was sedated and paralyzed and there was no patient effort?


For the leak alarm to start there has to be a leak >40% of the selected Vt as the ventilator will attempt to compensate for any leak occurring up to that volume. If no external leak from the circuit was detected it could have been a leak around the ETT cuff.
With a downstream leak on the patient side of the sensor and added flow from the ventilator trying to compensate for the leak, that may have been seen as a patient effort.
Under these circumstances turn off the Trigger (set to “-“) to eliminate the one alarm and then concentrate on finding the leak.